Paul Mativenga

Professor in Multi-scale and Sustainable Manufacturing

Innovative Manufacturing research theme

Paul Mativenga

We are a major centre of engineering education and research both at national and international levels. As a large School, we are close to a one-stop-shop for someone searching for engineering experts or graduates for employment.

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Teaching

I have been at Manchester since 2001, and love working for a such a research-intensive university and teaching the high calibre of students we attract.

We are a major centre of engineering education and research both at national and international levels. As a large School, we are close to a one-stop-shop for someone searching for engineering experts or graduates for employment.

I think teaching is an excellent way to learn. I have been lecturing for over a decade, but I revise my lecture notes every term and update them. My teaching is informed and enriched by the knowledge gained from my research and my work with industry.

My focus and strategy of delivering lectures is strengthened by the feedback I get from students and tutees and the best practice I pick up from other lectures.

I prefer interactive teaching, and I have recently been using real life videos of manufacturing to bring to life the concepts within the context of a lecture.

Research

I love academic curiosity, searching for solutions to those questions I find interesting and society finds scientifically challenging. I love being the first person internationally to pioneer a new manufacturing method or explain the scientific principles behind the operation of a manufacturing process, or to find clever, faster or cheaper ways of making products.

I am strongly of the view that manufacturing research should be linked to wealth creation. I explore those topics that I find nationally important, exciting, and ethical and aligned to my expertise and core values.

My research is concerned with the development of manufacturing technologies for making things that are too small to be seen by the naked eye or too challenging to make because of the limited applicability of existing engineering science. This involves looking at the difficulties that occur when materials are shaped at micro and nanometer length scales and scaling up this technology so that it can be used by industry.

My second topic of research is concerned with the challenge of reducing energy demand and improving resource efficiency in manufacturing by formulating new technologies and systems that optimise material usage and/or significantly reduce electrical energy requirements in manufacture. We would like industry to make products competitively, at low cost and with reduced negative environmental impact.

I work jointly with industry in machining parts for microsystems, in precision machining of engineering components and also in the use of lasers in manufacturing.

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